Course Descriptions

Fall 2014 Honors Courses

HONORS Core curriculum

HONS-H194-001 Ignatian Colloquium

N. Yavneh

W 4:55pm-6:10pm

ENGL-H121-F02 “21st Century Slavery and Abolition”

L. Murphy

TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

Though most people think that slavery ended in 1865, there are nonetheless 27 million people enslaved around the world today, despite vigorous efforts of activists to stamp out this practice. Focusing on the accounts of survivors and activists, both in texts and in virtual classroom visits, this course examines the problem of modern slavery and explores opportunities for students to participate in its eradication.

ENGL-H121-F01 “Interpreting Airports”

C. Schaberg

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

What kind of places are airports? Where are you when you are in an airport? How are these spaces uniquely predictable, or unpredictable and weird? When do airports become aesthetic or literary places, places that call for wonder, inquiry, and imagination? What about airports can be mind-numbing, terrifying, or just plain bland? In this class we will read a variety of texts about airports, in order to think critically about these modern sites and write about their strange qualities and ordinary aspects.

HIST-H121-F34 "Rebellion and Revolution in China”

R. Thum

TR 4:55pm-6:10pm

China is often mistakenly portrayed as a place of conformity and respect for authority.  This course shatters that myth by exploring cultures of rebellion and revolution, starting with the China’s latest
uprisings and protests and tracing traditions of disobedience backward in time through music, visual art, literature, artifacts, and historical writing.  Much of the course will focus on the modern period, but we will also examine the roots of China’s cultures of rebellion, which reach back over three millennia.  Since China represents one quarter of the world’s population, no understanding of the meaning of revolution can be complete without a study of China’s revolutionary thought and art.  By drawing comparisons with revolutionary traditions from other parts of the world, the course invites students to re-examine their own notions of rebellion and revolution in light of this often overlooked but globally significant tradition.

HIST-H121-F33 “Creating Medieval Monsters”

S. Butler

MWF 11:30am-12:20pm

Since 9/11, persecution of the “other" has been a theme of daily life in twenty-first century America, where random events can trigger persecution that very quickly spirals out of control. To illustrate the common roots of persecution, this course examines a much earlier period of demonization:  the High Middle Ages, where communities of Christians, feeling threatened by both external and internal forces, protected themselves by turning those at the margins into “monsters”--Jews, lepers, Muslims, heretics, homosexuals, women, and others.

HONS-H121-F01 “Islam, Spain, New Orleans”

E. Doll

MWF 1:30pm-2:20pm

How does one culture influence another? Starting with the medieval history of Spain, when Islamic culture was at its peak in Europe, this course examines how Islam affected the existing Christian and Jewish cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. We will explore the cross-cultural history of 18th century New Orleans, when it was part of the Spanish empire, and investigate current immigration—legal and illegal—from Africa to Spain, comparing the problems and benefits of cross-cultural assimilation to our own neighborhoods. The class includes 20 hours of required Service Learning working with the Isleños community of St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, as well as trips to the Isleños Museum and the “Spanish” Quarter of New Orleans.

PHIL-H215-033 “Lying, Misleading, and the Ethics of Assertion”

P. Leland

MW 3:30pm-4:45pm

This course introduces students to ethical dimensions of assertion, with a particular focus on the distinction between lying and misleading. At the outset, students will examine a normative ethical framework in which the importance of true assertion is particularly prominent. The remainder of the course will then consider recent work in the philosophy of language which sheds new light on the distinction between lying and misleading, and its potential ethical significance. We will conclude by examining the difference between lying, bullshitting, and other morally significant speech acts.

RELS-H215-033 “Public Policy: Ethical Perspectives”

K. Keulman

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

The course examines issues of public policy and ethics as they play out in the U.S. constitutional system. It will analyze current forms of ethics in a way that addresses contemporary social divisions, both urban and global. Some of these issues include: the relationship between domestic and foreign policy, economic globalization, environmental issues, and bioethics policy. The role of ethics in both responding to and shaping public policy, as policy develops out of the interplay of social forces, will be examined. This subject is approached through an analysis of political, economic, and religious conceptions of social order, and ways in which moral reasoning contributes to the process of responsible policy formation. The course examines moral obligations of public officials in democratic polities. It explores such subjects as the appeal to personal conscience in public decision-making, the management of conflicts of values, and the ethics of loyalty and dissent in public office. Readings are drawn partially from selected case studies, with both a domestic and an international focus.

SOCI-H396-033 “Social Justice Seminar”

L. Miron

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

This seminar will analyze and suggest strategies for promoting social justice, locally, nationally, and globally.  Using three frameworks (conceptual lens)—Justice as ‘Fairness’, Catholic Social Thought, and Economic theory—seminar participants will examine “hot spot” issues of fairness ranging from global inequality to the school to prison “pipeline.” A major goal of the seminar format is to encourage extensive discussion, lively debate, and deep reflection of individual moral values and code of ethics. A host of outside speakers will complement course readings.

SOCI-H396-034 “Social Deviance and Social Change”

G. Capowich

MWF 1:30pm-2:20pm

Deviance is a broad concept that incorporates any behaviour, whether engaged in by individuals or groups, which goes against prevailing social practices and norms.  This course will focus on how deviance rises to group actions that are intended to spur social change.  Studying social deviance is a perspective to understand human behavior, collective action to advocate for social change, elements of collective actions that contribute to social change, and how social reactions (particularly moral panics) to the deviance contribute to social change.  This course will use applied sociological methods within an interdisciplinary approach to study how social deviance gives rise to collective efforts that aim to change society and how these interact with social reactions and moral panics engendered by the deviance. This class will take a case study approach using the following examples of how social deviance engendered a social reaction to result in social change: the Salem Witch Trials, Pornography and the Anti-Pornography Movement, Drug Addiction and Drug Abuse.

SOCI-H396-035 “Violence and Democracy”

L. Voigt

TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

Using the lens of the social scientific perspective and analytical tools, Violence and Democracy provides a broad, interdisciplinary understanding of the complexities and controversies surrounding the problem of violence in a democratic society. This course is designed to encourage students to develop an appreciation for scientifically constructed knowledge and to apply critical thinking and analytical techniques in assessing various databases, theories of causation, social policies, and solutions related to violence. Special emphasis is given to social policies that are intended to prevent and control violence, paying particular attention to the underlying theoretical assumptions and their social justice and human rights implications. The relationship between science and social policy as well as questions associated with the ethics and politics of scientific theory and research related to violence is considered on state, national, and international levels. Academic and theoretical knowledge will be combined with practical applications and real-life experiences in a community-engaged learning project, with special emphasis devoted to larger social issues connected with violence and democratic societies, such as differential life chances, poverty, gender and racial inequality, and the consequences of changes taking place in the world.

HONS-H491-033 Honors Thesis

N. Yavneh

 

ENGLISH/Literature

ENGL-H295-033 “The Self in the Novel”

S. Allison

MWF 9:30am-10:20am

This course will consider the way the novel form constructs the relationship between the self and society.  We will look at how the individual protagonist emerges in such novels as Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (1719); Jane Austen’s Emma (1816); George Eliot’s Mill on the Floss (1860); and Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart (1958).  We'll read literary criticism on plot, character, and narrative discourse.  As part of a Jesuit Honors Program, this course is an opportunity to learn how novels work and also to ask why they matter.  Can reading novels make you a better person?  Can reading novels make you a worse person?  How have theorists of the novel and novelists themselves answered these questions?  The formal writing for the course is a substantial research paper on a novel of your choice. You may choose any novel, including those on the syllabus, as long as it matters to you.

ENGL-H295-034 “Writing for the Ear”

J. Biguenet

T 3:30pm-6:10pm

 

FINE ARTS

ENGL-H295-034 “Writing for the Ear”

J. Biguenet

T 3:30pm-6:10pm

THEA-H295-033 “Acting for the Ear”

A. Preeshl

TR 3:30pm-4:45pm

Acting for the Ear is a new course in audio narratives that will culminate in live and broadcast performances of radio plays written by students in Professor John Biguenet’s Writing for the Ear course. Seats for theatre and honors students have been reserved to promote skills in performing voiceovers, audio books and podcast plays. The voiceovers, audio books, podcasts, and radio plays will be recorded and broadcast by the students in Dr. John Snyder’s Recording Studio Techniques and Audio for Film and TV. Students will acquire skills in acting, vocal range, articulation, script analysis, and character interpretation through recorded audio narratives.

 

HISTORY

HIST-H295-033 “The Idea of America”

M. Fernandez

TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

This course will ponder the idea(s) behind the creation and development of the United States of America from pre-Columbian times to the near present. What idea or ideas are essential to the birth and development of the country? Who are its people? Why do the "Uniters" feel comfortable appropriating the term "American" at the expense of all other Americans? These questions and many, many more will be considered in this class via essential texts and documents, histories, film, literature, and a host of other mediums and disciplines. As one former student said, "how can you not be interested in this stuff? It's your country man!" Is it?

 

MATHEMATICS

MATH-H295-033 “The Golden Age of Mathematics”

R. Tucci                                                                                        

MWF 9:30am-10:20am

This course presents the development of Mathematics from a cultural, historical, and scientific point of view. The role and influence of Mathematics in the development of civilization are emphasized; simultaneously, mathematical knowledge and techniques are taught. Esthetic and artistic aspects of Mathematics are highlighted. Topics are taken from, but not limited to, the following: Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, chaos and fractals, number theory, history of Mathematics  

MATH-H257-033 “Calculus I for Honors”

A. Mattei

MWF 8:30am-9:20am with W 12:30pm lab

 

NATURAL SCIENCE

CHEM-A105/ CHEM-H107-023 “General Chemistry w/ Honors Lab”

Any professor for lecture, Lab w/C. Heinecke

Any section for lecture, Lab W 1:30pm-4:30pm

PHYS-H295-001 “Astronomy: Our Cosmic Connection"
T. Biswas

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Our Earth came into existence due to a series of rather remarkable (and often fortuitous) series of events... starting from the Big Bang to the creation of the building blocks of atoms, the formation of atoms themselves which clustered into swirling hot clouds of gas that eventually collapsed to form stars along with their surrounding planets. While the quest of knowledge about our past is a never-ending one, this course will trace our history we have uncovered so far. In doing so we will also learn how the scientific method works and enables us to discover the secrets of nature. Only very basic knowledge about algebra and geometry is required, and they will be reviewed in lectures.

 

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL-H295-034 “Philosophy: The Big Questions”

M. Rombeiro

MW 3:30pm-4:45pm

This course will explore major philosophical questions in metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics: What is the nature of being? Does a god exist? Are we capable of knowing the truth about reality? What are the limits and conditions of human knowledge? What is the foundation for the moral law? Is there an absolute right and wrong? What is the meaning of life? Students will engage these questions through the writings of prominent thinkers in the history of philosophy, including Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, and Nietzsche.

PHIL-H295-033 “The Question of Being”

M. Gossiaux

TR 9:30am-10:45am

More than two thousand years ago, Aristotle defined metaphysics as the science of being as being. For centuries philosophers have speculated about the nature of reality. What does it mean to say that something is real? Why is there something rather than nothing? How can we account for the multiplicity of being? Do all things have being in the same way? What is the relation between being and truth? between being and the good? Is there any reason for thinking that God is a being?  In this seminar we examine these questions by means of a careful reading of several classic texts from Plato, Aristotle, and Thomas Aquinas.

PHIL-H215-033 “Lying, Misleading, and the Ethics of Assertion”

P. Leland

MW 3:30pm-4:45pm

This course introduces students to ethical dimensions of assertion, with a particular focus on the distinction between lying and misleading. At the outset, students will examine a normative ethical framework in which the importance of true assertion is particularly prominent. The remainder of the course will then consider recent work in the philosophy of language which sheds new light on the distinction between lying and misleading, and its potential ethical significance. We will conclude by examining the difference between lying, bullshitting, and other morally significant speech acts. 

 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELS-H215-033 “Public Policy: Ethical Perspectives”

K. Keulman

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

The course examines issues of public policy and ethics as they play out in the U.S. constitutional system. It will analyze current forms of ethics in a way that addresses contemporary social divisions, both urban and global. Some of these issues include: the relationship between domestic and foreign policy, economic globalization, environmental issues, and bioethics policy. The role of ethics in both responding to and shaping public policy, as policy develops out of the interplay of social forces, will be examined. This subject is approached through an analysis of political, economic, and religious conceptions of social order, and ways in which moral reasoning contributes to the process of responsible policy formation. The course examines moral obligations of public officials in democratic polities. It explores such subjects as the appeal to personal conscience in public decision-making, the management of conflicts of values, and the ethics of loyalty and dissent in public office. Readings are drawn partially from selected case studies, with both a domestic and an international focus.

RELS-H295-033 “Liberation Theology”

A. Alcazar

TR 4:55pm-6:10pm

 

SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCI-H396-033 “Social Justice Seminar”

L. Miron

This seminar will analyze and suggest strategies for promoting social justice, locally, nationally, and globally.  Using three frameworks (conceptual lens)—Justice as ‘Fairness’, Catholic Social Thought, and Economic theory—seminar participants will examine “hot spot” issues of fairness ranging from global inequality to the school to prison “pipeline.” A major goal of the seminar format is to encourage extensive discussion, lively debate, and deep reflection of individual moral values and code of ethics. A host of outside speakers will complement course readings.

SOCI-H396-034 “Social Deviance and Social Change”

G. Capowich

Deviance is a broad concept that incorporates any behaviour, whether engaged in by individuals or groups, which goes against prevailing social practices and norms.  This course will focus on how deviance rises to group actions that are intended to spur social change.  Studying social deviance is a perspective to understand human behavior, collective action to advocate for social change, elements of collective actions that contribute to social change, and how social reactions (particularly moral panics) to the deviance contribute to social change.  This course will use applied sociological methods within an interdisciplinary approach to study how social deviance gives rise to collective efforts that aim to change society and how these interact with social reactions and moral panics engendered by the deviance. This class will take a case study approach using the following examples of how social deviance engendered a social reaction to result in social change: the Salem Witch Trials, Pornography and the Anti-Pornography Movement, Drug Addiction and Drug Abuse.

SOCI-H396-035 “Violence and Democracy”

L. Voigt

TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

Using the lens of the social scientific perspective and analytical tools, Violence and Democracy provides a broad, interdisciplinary understanding of the complexities and controversies surrounding the problem of violence in a democratic society. This course is designed to encourage students to develop an appreciation for scientifically constructed knowledge and to apply critical thinking and analytical techniques in assessing various databases, theories of causation, social policies, and solutions related to violence. Special emphasis is given to social policies that are intended to prevent and control violence, paying particular attention to the underlying theoretical assumptions and their social justice and human rights implications. The relationship between science and social policy as well as questions associated with the ethics and politics of scientific theory and research related to violence is considered on state, national, and international levels. Academic and theoretical knowledge will be combined with practical applications and real-life experiences in a community-engaged learning project, with special emphasis devoted to larger social issues connected with violence and democratic societies, such as differential life chances, poverty, gender and racial inequality, and the consequences of changes taking place in the world.

 

classical Humanities

GREK-H295-001 “Honors Beginning Greek”

K. Rosenbecker

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Honors Beginning Greek (GREK H295) is fast-paced and engaging version of first semester ancient Greek, ideal for students who are interested in the Classical world, for students who are preparing for a career in the sciences, or for students who are simply looking to enrich their appreciation of how language works.   The course will take students through the foundational elements of ancient Greek--the unique writing system, core vocabulary, and principles of sentence structure--with an emphasis on understanding grammar and translating with accuracy and confidence.  Honors Beginning Greek features traditional and digital instructional materials and introductions to the basic tools of ancient Greek scholarship.  The course also provides students with a solid background in understanding how languages, even created "languages" like formal logic or math, organize themselves. Moreover, the course provides students with the chance to become familiar with the root words that form the backbone of our modern scientific terminology. Honors Beginning Greek is the first step in preparing students to read New Testament Greek and to read the Greek of Homer, Sophocles, and Plato, with readings in these original texts beginning at the end of the second semester.  Free tutoring for Honors Beginning Greek is offered through the Classical Studies Department.  Honors Beginning Greek may be counted as part of either the language requirement or as an Honors requirement; please check with your advisor for more details on requirements.  For more information about Honors Beginning Greek, please contact Dr. Rosenbecker at krosenbe@loyno.edu.

 

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