FYE Common Experience Program Overview

The First-Year Experience (FYE) is designed to provide incoming first-year students with an interactive and cross-disciplinary program that cultivates intellectual inquiry, encourages critical and ethical thinking, and promotes social justice. In keeping with Jesuit values, the FYE strengthens the sense of community across the entire campus, as well as in the interaction between Loyola and the surrounding community, engaging not only faculty, staff, and students, but the city of New Orleans in all its diversity. 

THEME

Centered around the theme of “Encountering Each Other,” the 2018-19 FYE will focus discussions around body politics, difference, diversity, otherness, discrimination, etc. This year’s theme also provides an opportunity to gain insight into the motley roots of the city of New Orleans, as it celebrates its 300th anniversary and showcase its boundless diversity of African, Spanish, Creole, Caribbean, and French heritage. 

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS (FALL 2018)

  • ROUNDTABLE (Thursday, September 20, 2018, Roussel Hall, 7-8:30p.m.)

Animated by a panel of campus scholars from various disciplines, this event will provide discussions around the campus-wide assigned book, Tatoos on the Heart, authored by Greg Boyle, Father of Homeboy Industries, about his twenty-year experience as a gang-interventionist in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles. Written as a succession of essays, Boyle's work provides a most humanistic insight into the power of understanding one another and believing in unconditional love.

  • LOYOTHON (Tuesday, October 23, 2018, Roussel Hall, 7-8:30p.m.)

This 100-item trivia competition will be an opportunity for first-year students to celebrate the diversity of New Orleans by showcasing their knowledge about the Crescent City during its Tricentennial. Prizes will be awarded to first, second, and third places.

  • TATOOS/TA-TWOs (Tuesday, November 20, 2018, Roussel Hall, 7-8:30p.m.)

This evening performance will feature a selection of original staged monologues and scenes by first-year students enrolled in the first-year seminar on Performance and Performativity. Interspersed with vocal and instrumental music, these powerful and personal accounts are meant to instill in all individuals an open-mindedness towards, and respect for, diversity and otherness.